CIS 115 All Exercises and iLabs Logic and Design

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CIS 115 All Exercises and iLabs Logic and Design


Week 1 Exercise

Assignment:

This activity will assist you in the understanding of how output should appear after statements are executed (results) and how to write proper pseudocode.

  1. Show the result of each pseudocode program.
  2. Also rewrite the pseudocode statements using Assignment statements.

Rubric:

When completed compile the following documents together neatly in 1 & 2 order:

1) This instruction sheet first

2) Your answer sheet, second

Week 1 iLab

  1. Lab #: CIS CIS 115-A1
  2. Lab 1 of 1 :

Fireworks Stand Checkout

  1. Lab Overview – Scenario / Summary:

TCO #4–Given a simple business problem that requires one or more decisions, create a solution algorithm that uses decisions with logical and relational expressions.

TCO #5–Given a simple business program that requires iteration, create a solution algorithm that employs loops.

TCO #9–Given a program with logic errors that is intended as a solution to a simple business problem, employ debugging diagnostics to remove and correct the errors.

Scenario:

Your algorithm will keep track of a customer’s purchases at the local fireworks stand. Customers will not know exactly how many items they will purchase, so using a FOR loop on this lab is not allowed. Let’s keep the rules simple.


Week 2

Week 2 Exercise

Given a simple business problem, design a solution algorithm that uses arithmetic expressions and built-in functions.

Assignment:

Your goal is to solve the following simple programming exercise. You have been contracted by a local restaurant to design an algorithm determining the total meal charges. The algorithm should ask the user for the total food purchase and the tip percent. Then, the algorithm will calculate the amount of a tip, a 7% sales tax, and the total meal charge (including tip). The food purchase, sales tax, tip amount, and total meal charge will need to be displayed to the customer.

Be sure to THINK about the logic and design first (IPO chart and pseudocode), then code the Visual Logic command line processing. Display all output using currency formatting (built-in Visual Logic function).

CIS 115 Week 2 Lab Total Meal Purchases (Devry)

Scenario/Summary

Your goal is to solve the following simple programming exercise. You have been contracted by a local antique store to design an algorithm determining the total purchases and sales tax. According to the store owner, the user will need to see the subtotal, the sales tax amount, and the total purchase amount. A customer is purchasing four items from the antique store. Design an algorithm where the user will enter the price of each of the four items. The algorithm will determine the subtotal, the sales tax, and the total purchase amount. Assume the sales tax is 7%.

Be sure to THINK about the logic and design first (IPO chart and pseudocode), then code the Visual Logic command line processing. Display all output using currency formatting (built-in Visual Logic function).

Advanced (optional): Use a constant for the 7% sales tax.

Deliverables Total Purchases IPO Model Total Purchases Pseudocode Total Purchases Flowchart Total Purchases Output Sample 


Week 3

Week 3 Exercise

Week 3 Activity – Calculate Overtime Pay TCO #4 – Given a simple business problem that requires one or more decisions, create a solution algorithm that uses decisions with logical and relational expressions. TCO #9 – Given a program with logic errors that is intended as a solution to a simple business problem, employ debugging diagnostics to remove and correct the errors. Assignment: You will need to design an application that it will prompt a user for their hourly pay rate, their hours worked, and whether they are single, married, divorced, or widowed. It will then calculate their gross and net pay. If they work more than 40 hours, overtime is calculated at 1 ½ times the regular rate and displayed separately. If they are married, use a flat tax rate of 15%. If they are single, use 22%, if they are divorced, use 23%, and if they are widowed, use 13% (I realize that these are not very realistic). Here is a sample of what the program should do when run: (No overtime example) Enter hourly pay rate: 10.00 Enter hours worked: 35 Enter letter for (M)arried, (S)ingle, (D)ivorced, (W)idowed: M Gross pay is $350.00 Net pay is $297.50 (Overtime example) Enter hourly pay rate: 10.00 Enter hours worked: 45 Enter letter for (M)arried, (S)ingle, (D)ivorced, (W)idowed: S Regular pay is $400.00 Overtime pay is $75.00 Gross pay is $475.00 Net pay is $370.50 Rubric: When completed staple the following documents together neatly in 1,2,3,4 order: 1) This instruction sheet first 2) The IPO Chart, second 3) The Pseudocode, third 4) The Flowchart and output example last. Point distribution for this application: Calculate Overtime Pay Document: Points possible: Points received IPO Chart 5 Pseudocode 5 Flowchart and output 10 Total Points 20 IPO Chart: Input Processing Output Pseudocode: Begin calculateOvertimePay End Flowchart: Example Output after execution:

CIS 115 Week 3 Lab Decision Calendar (Devry)

i L A B O V E R V I E WScenario/Summary

Your goal is to solve the following programming lab activity. Write a program that prompts and accepts a number between 1 and 12. After getting the input, display the number with the appropriate month. (example: This is the 1st month…January, This is the 2nd month…February, This is the 12th month…December).

Be sure to THINK about the logic and design first (IPO chart and/or pseudocode), then code the Visual Logic command line processing.

Deliverables Decision Calendar IPO Model Decision Calendar Pseudocode Decision Calendar Flowchart Decision Calendar Output Sample `


Week 4

Week 4 Exercise

TCO #4 – Given a simple business problem that requires one or more decisions, create a solution algorithm that uses decisions with logical and relational expressions.

TCO #9 – Given a program with logic errors that is intended as a solution to a simple business problem, employ debugging diagnostics to remove and correct the errors.

Assignment: You will need to design an application that will receive the weight of a parcel and calculate and display the cost per kg and the delivery charge for that parcel. Calculate the charges using the following data:

Parcel Weight (kg) Cost per kg ($)

< 2.5=”” kg=”” $3.50=”” per=”” kg=””>

2.5 to 5 kg $2.85 per kg

> 5kg $2.45 per kg

Make sure that the weight entered is a positive number, otherwise your program should display an error message and end. Test your algorithm with the following THREE sets of data:

Test case 1: package weight of 2 kg

Test case 2: package weight of 5 kg

Test case 3: package weight of 6 kg

CIS 115 Week 4 Lab Grade Calendar (Devry)

You have been asked to design a program that will allow a teacher to calculate the percentage and the final grade for students in a class. The program will prompt the teacher to enter the student’s first and last name and the number of points the student received. The program shall only accept scores between 0 and 1,000 points (including 0 and 1,000), with 1,000 points being the maximum number of points. If the input value is within the valid range, the program will display a “good score” message; otherwise, the program will display an error message and then terminate the program. The program shall then calculate the score percentage, and then determine the grade based on the percentage using the following grade criteria:

The program will then display the student’s first name, last name, number of points, calculated percentage, and the final grade.

The program shall have an initial prompt informing the user of the program’s purpose, and a program termination message.

Be sure to THINK about the logic and design first (IPO chart and pseudocode), then code the Visual Logic command line processing. 


Week 5 

Week 5 Exercise

Assignment (part A): Your goal is to solve the following simple programming exercise. Using a FOR loop, write an algorithm that displays the squares of the numbers 1 to 10 to console output. Thought provoking question: Do you need to accept input?

Assignment (part B): Using a pretest WHILE loop, write an algorithm that displays the squares of the numbers 1 to 10 to console output.

Assignment (part C): This is extra for those who desire a challenge. Accomplish the same output as above, but use a posttest WHILE loop this time.

Be sure to THINK about the logic and design first (IPO chart and or pseudocode), then code the Visual Logic command line processing.

Rubric:

When completed staple the following documents together neatly in 1,2,3,4 order:

1) This instruction sheet first

2) The IPO Chart, second

3) The Pseudocode, third

4) The Flowchart and output example last. 

CIS 115 Week 5 Lab Fireworks Stand Checkout (Devry)

Your algorithm will keep track of a customer’s purchases at the local fireworks stand. Customers will not know exactly how many items they will purchase, so using a for-loop on this lab is not allowed. Let’s keep the rules simple.

Accept the dollar value of each item purchased from the user until the user is finished. When purchases are complete, enter a sentinel value of -1 (indicating the user has finished). If the item purchased is $50.00 or more, give your customer a 10% discount on the item purchased. Display all of the purchases to the customer with the original price and the discount price.

Be sure to THINK about the logic and design first (IPO chart and pseudocode), then code the Visual Logic command line processing.

Deliverables Firework Stand Checkout IPO Model Firework Stand Checkout Pseudocode Firework Stand Checkout Flowchart Firework Stand Checkout Output Sample 


Week 6 

Week 6 Exercise

Assignment: Arrays are incredible fun! Today we are going to work on a program to keep track of our homework scores for a math class. Write a program that accepts five homework scores as input values and stores them into a table (which is another name for an array). Once the scores are in the array, we can process them again and again.

First, load the scores in your array. Second, display the contents of the array in order. Third, display array in reverse order. Fourth, calculate the average of the five scores entered in the array. Finally, the algorithm should display all the homework scores in the array that are larger than the previously calculated average. Make sure you use some output statements to clarify all the details you are displaying, being cautious about spelling and communicating to your user.

Be sure to THINK about the logic and design first (IPO chart and or pseudocode), then code the Visual Logic command line processing.

Rubric:

When completed staple the following documents together neatly in 1,2,3,4 order:

1) This instruction sheet first

2) The IPO Chart, second

3) The Pseudocode, third

4) The Flowchart and output example last. 

 

CIS 115 Week 6 Lab Fireworks Stand Checkout (Devry)

Your algorithm will keep track of a customer’s purchases at the local fireworks stand. Customers will not know exactly how many items they will purchase, so using a for-loop on this lab is not allowed. Let’s keep the rules simple.

Accept the dollar value of each item purchased from the user until the user is finished. When purchases are complete, enter a sentinel value of -1 (Make certain you do not include the -1 sentinel value in your total). Keep track of the total dollar amount of all fireworks purchased. Keep a tally of the number of items purchased. If more than 20 items were purchased, give your customer a 10% discount on the total purchases. Once purchases are complete, display the total number of items purchased, the average price of the items, the total of all fireworks purchased, any discount if applicable, and the total of all fireworks purchased minus the discount.

Be sure to THINK about the logic and design first (IPO chart and/or pseudocode), then code the Visual Logic command line processing.

Deliverables Firework Stand Checkout IPO Model Firework Stand Checkout Pseudocode Firework Stand Checkout Flowchart Firework Stand Checkout Output Sample  


Week 7 

Week 7 Exercise

Assignment: Your goal is to solve the following simple programming exercise. You have been asked by your accounting department to design an algorithm determining the annual profit for your company. The algorithm should ask the user for the projected monthly sales for 12 months. Then, you need to determine the annual profit and display it to the user. The annual profit is 21% of the total sales.

Part A: Using Visual Logic, write the monthly sales amounts to a file, monthly_Sales.dat. (Hint: be sure to enter a sentinel value for end of file processing later.)

Part B: Using a separate algorithm, use the monthly_Sales.dat file as input to determine the company’s annual profit.

Be sure to THINK about the logic and design first (IPO chart and or pseudocode), then code the Visual Logic command line processing.

Rubric:

When completed staple the following documents together neatly in 1,2,3,4 order:

1) This instruction sheet first

2) The IPO Chart, second

3) The Pseudocode, third

4) The Flowchart and output example last. 

 

CIS 115 Week 7 Lab Fireworks Stand Checkout (Devry)

In this lab, you are going to extend the Fireworks Checkout Stand application in Week 6. This week, we will be more efficient by using files and modularizing the program. This week, we will also load our array of valid zip codes from a text file. In addition, we will modify the existing code to create a modularized design.

Load the array via a .txt file. Prompt to see if the user wants to search for a zip code. Prompt the user to enter a zip code and search against the array. If the zip code is found in the array, continue processing the sale. If the zip code is not found in the array, display a message stating, “State law prohibits selling fireworks for people living in the zip code”. Modularize your code.

Be sure to THINK about the logic and design first (IPO chart and/or pseudocode), then code the Visual Logic command line processing. 

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